Throughout this seven post series on gratitude we have covered the basics and if you’re just seeing this for the first time, you can go back and read the beginning posts here. Thank you for joining me today as we learn how we can start practicing gratitude on a large scale.

 

There is a quote that speaks to me especially regarding this topic of gratitude.

The purpose of life is to discover your gift. The work of life is to develop it. The meaning of life is to give your gift away.– David Viscott

On the one hand, this quote demands that you must find something meaningful in living before you can share it with the world. It requires you to think deeply and come up with something “unique” about your experience on this planet and to develop it, before you are “allowed” to share it with the world and find meaning or love in this life.

Here is the truth though: Everyone’s gift is the ability to feel gracious. You will always love and be loved for sharing your graciousness. Being gracious will never cost you more than you can afford because it’s not about putting yourself last. Being gracious will never lead you to pain because you cannot control the actions or reactions of others; only yourself. But yes, being gracious is a skill that needs developing.

Practicing Gratitude on a large scale | jessicafwalker.com

So how do we start practicing gratitude on a large scale? So far, these posts have been more about what gratitude is, and why we should use it to improve our lives. Now I want to talk about how we can create real change. And the answer is easy. It starts with you.

If you’re looking to share the gifts you have, there are literally a million ways to do that. The easiest of them is to volunteer at events.

For instance, running is the thing to do now, and many races have a charity they’re donating a portion of their proceeds to. They need attendants at water stations, first aid stations, and to help set up and take down the finish lines. Not to mention, they’ll also need volunteers for the actual planning of events, or possibly additional fundraising opportunities.

If being around a race corral isn’t your thing, look at finding a homeless shelter or soup kitchen to spend time serving a meal or sharing a meal. Colorado Springs has a place called Seeds Community Cafe, where anyone can eat a meal of delicious, nutritious, allergy friendly food and choose to pay as much as they can afford for the meal. It is run largely by volunteers, which help offset costs. There are examples of restaurants like this all across the country.

If you’ve ever experienced an event in your life where a non-profit stepped in to support you and/or your family, perhaps now would be the chance to host an informational dinner/fundraiser to show your gratitude to the organization.

If you don’t know where to start with these ideas of volunteering, below are some links to places that can direct your interests further.

There are stories all over the internet of the power of free hugs. People crave a moment of intimacy and we need those touches to stay connected to each other. If you’re into it, or interested in exploring the social change a hug can make, perhaps this is the path for you.

This list could literally be endless, but for now I’ll end it here. Please share with me in the comments how you have shown your practice of gratitude on a large scale. I’d love to hear your ideas and experiences!

The next post will be about practicing gratitude within. I hope you’ll stay with us, and as ever, thank you so much for reading today. If you’ve enjoyed this series on Gratitude, please share it with your friends on social media and join my email list! 

Thank you for being here today.

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